Hello World :)

I work at the intersection of cheminformatics and environmental chemistry, which is what this blog will mostly be about.

I completed my MSc. Environmental Sciences at ETH Zurich, Switzerland, where I was awarded the ETH Master’s Scholarship.

Prior to that, I graduated magna cum laude with a B.A. Chemistry from Wellesley College, USA, where I received the Gulick Farnsworth scholarship award.

Currently, I am doing a joint/dual PhD (finishing in 2022!) at the Environmental Cheminformatics Group based at the Luxembourg Centre for Systems Biomedicine, Luxembourg and the Cheminformatics and Computational Metabolomics Group, based at Friedrich Schiller University, Germany.

In my PhD, I develop open cheminformatics and computational methods to identify unknown chemicals detected in the environment. I’ve worked with Swiss and Luxembourgish authorities to help identify chemical pollutants detected using Liquid Chromatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry. Working with open environmental chemistry data is critical to our efforts.

My current interests are in tackling the most challenging next frontier of environmental unknowns – substances of Unknown or Variable composition, Complex reaction products, or Biological materials (UVCBs).

UVCBs include compounds forming homologous series such as surfactants and PFAS mixtures. I am developing cheminformatics methods to help identify UVCBs in environmental samples.

Besides my studies and PhD research, I have contributed technical expertise to multiple international projects related to sustainability, chemicals, and waste, most recently to UN Environment’s Global Chemicals Outlook II report and Assessment Report on Issues of Concern: Chemicals and Waste Issues Posing Risks to Human Health and the Environment. I also led a report on Solid Waste Management in Small Island Developing States, following fieldwork in the Seychelles.

I was born and grew up in Petaling Jaya, Malaysia.

Publications


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This site is built using Jekyll & Minimal Mistakes and hosted on GitHub pages. As usual, it took longer than it should have (but hey, crash course in web development :)).

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